Drum Beats: Fact Sheets

This photo is the front page of the accessible One Way of Knowing Drum Beat that depicts the AIVRTTAC logo of an eagle holding 5 arrows flying through a circle next to the title of the Drum Beat.

One Way of Knowing Is Not Always the Best Way: Introduction to Evidence Based Practice for AIVRS Programs (7 downloads)

 

The central goal of vocational rehabilitation (VR) is to assist people with disabilities to attain and sustain gainful employment. A common model for accomplishing this is called evidence-based practice (EBP). Sadly, EBP is poorly understood in general, but its application to American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) is even more confusing and, in some cases, its appropriateness has been questioned. For this reason, the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Training and Technical Assistance Center (AIVRTTAC) has adopted a broader perspective of EBP to guide training and technical assistance to AIVRS programs. Our perspective is different. We think this broad perspective of EBP is a better cultural match to AIVRS programs and that this framework will help programs build capacity toward more effective service to tribal members with disabilities. Ultimately, effective decisions made by VR counselors in partnership with clients (based on the EBP framework described below) will enhance employment outcomes of American Indians with disabilities. EBP can be a useful framework for AIVRS programs, but before it can be, EBP has to be properly understood. This document briefly describes common definitions and uses of the phrase “evidence-based practice” and reveals some aspects of EBP that are less known, but very relevant to AIVRS programs.

 

This photo is the front page of the accessible Resources for AI Drum Beat that depicts the AIVRTTAC logo of an eagle holding 5 arrows flying through a circle next to the title of the Drum Beat.

Resources for American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services Programs (6 downloads)

 

The American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Training and Technical Assistance Center (AIVRTTAC) is developing a variety of resources for American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) programs across the country. As part of this process, we will be involved in knowledge translation, which means that we read, study, and organize knowledge and then develop training and technical assistance (TA) resources that AIVRS programs can use to enhance their VR practices. Our goal is to support the programs in managing their VR grants and increase successful employment outcomes for tribal members with disabilities. Not all AIVRS programs will need the same type, duration and intensity of support from us. We are creating a range of resources that can be used in a variety of ways to fulfill the needs of all AIVRS programs. To guide this work, we have adopted a multi-tiered model as an organizing framework.

 

This photo is the front page of the accessible Characteristics of Effective Vocational Rehabilitation Programs Drum Beat that depicts the AIVRTTAC logo of an eagle holding 5 arrows flying through a circle next to the title of the Drum Beat.

Characteristics of Effective Vocational Rehabilitation Programs (6 downloads)

 

Each American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AIVRS) program is unique because of their community’s traditions, history, established institutions, physical location, and economic strengths and/or weaknesses. AIVRS programs continue to progress toward their goals of assisting greater numbers of American Indians with disabilities to obtain and sustain their employment. Continual success comes with perseverance and direction. This Fact Sheet is designed to assist the AIVRS programs with direction. Regardless of where each AIVRS program is in their journey, there is a set of characteristics that each can strive to embody.